Mommy Must-Have: Milk Snob Cover


0f0fc5bebb3831133f6e526d36706b78I live in Ohio and the winters are cold. My first daughter was born in September, so she was tiny going into the winters months. It was a pain going out with her because you have to keep babies warm, but you can’t them in winter coats in their car seat (it’s unsafe to put little ones in puffy coats and strap them into their car seats, learn about it here). My youngest is almost 7 months old and can be moved to a convertible car seat, but I’m going to keep her in her infant seat during the winter because it’s easier to keep her warm and cozy, especially with our car seat cover from Milk Snob (that also doubles as a nursing cover and shopping car cover).

Milk Snob was created by Melanie Disbrow, a mom of three who moved to the US from Germany in 2006 after unsuccessfully finding a practical and fashionable car seat cover. It’s added nursing cover led to the design of the first patent pending multi functional cover on the market. Milk Snob offers beautiful modern swaddles, as well as their covers and drawstring multi functional nursing covers. Based in Dallas, TX, the Milk Snob continues to create beautiful and functional products for families.packagingcover1_5a985575-a63b-4921-ad77-0dcd79349331I desperately wanted to try a Milk Snob cover and was so excited when they offered to send one for me to review. The one I used with my oldest daughter is a very popular “free” car seat cover that is thick, doesn’t circulate air at all, and you can’t see baby unless you flip open the front. The Milk Snob cover is pretty much the best cover I’ve ever seen on the market. It’s made form a thin, breathable stretchy fabric that’s also modern and gorgeous. It fits on any infant car seat and I love that I can peek in on my little one from the top and that she can see me. It also protects baby from unwelcome touching and staring while ozu36285060_main_tm1456178349ut in public as we all know that strangers seem to think it’s okay to touch a random baby. And if you use a cover while nursing, this will actually be a welcomed fashion accessory because the prints are simply stunning. Now that my daughter sits up in shopping carts, this cover is perfect to keep her safe from yucky germs because she puts her mouth on everything, so it’s nice to be able to keep crazy illnesses out of her mouth! It’s so easy to use, it stretches in every which way but doesn’t stretch it out.

If you’re looking for a nursing cover, car seat cover, and shopping cart cover, definitely check out Milk Snob! You can spend a lot of money buying three different products, but at only $36, you’re getting a 3-in-1 cover and it can probably be used in many more ways. And with 37 different prints and colors, it’s hard to choose which one to get. Check out all of the amazing products Milk Snob has to offer and buy yours hereimg_1861_srgb!

Don’t forget to follow Milk Snob on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram to stay updated on sales and new releases!

– Casey

**BurritoBuzz received these products at low or no cost for the purpose of review or testing. No compensation for a positive review was provided. All product reviews are based 100% off of our personal experiences and we never guarantee a positive review.**

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Breastfeeding Glossary

Antibodies- A substance that protects against infection

Areola- The circular area of pigmented skin that surrounds the nipple

Breastfeeding.

  • a. Exclusive: Baby receives all nourishment and fluids at the breast.
  • b. Almost exclusive: Baby receives all nourishment at the breast except for small amounts of supplements.
  • c. Partial: Frequent or regular supplements.
  • d. Token: Minimal breastfeeding

Breast shell – a plastic shell that fits over the nipple, used to correct flat or inverted nipples.

Breast shield – a thin silicone shield that is placed over the nipple and areola during nursing.

Colostrum- A concentrated fluid secreted by the breast at the end of pregnancy and shortly after childbirth that provides nutrition as well as protection against disease

Engorgement– fullness, swilling, and enlargement of the breasts.

Foremilk– Low-fat milk that leaves the breast first during breastfeeding or pumping; the longer the time periods between breast drainage, the lower in fat the foremilk becomes

Hindmilk– Higher-fat milk that comes later during a breastfeeding or pumping as the breast becomes more fully drained

Inverted nipple – a nipple that retracts into the body, rather than protrudes when the areola is compressed.

Jaundice – caused by an excess of bilirubin, jaundice causes yellowing of the whites of the eyes and skin. Jaundice is relatively common among newborns, and is treatable.

Lactation -The action of producing and secreting milk

Lanolin- This cream is a savior to many breastfeeding mothers who experience sore, cracked nipples. It can soothe and protect, but make sure that you only use a pure form of lanolin to prevent allergies to the toxins that come in impure forms

Latching On – Latching on is when the baby takes the nipple and areola properly into his mouth to begin nursing. Proper positioning is critical, because your nipple needs to touch the roof of your baby’s mouth to stimulate him to latch on, suck and swallow.

Let-Down- This is the process where the brain tells the body to produce milk and make it available in the breast. Let-down occurs when the baby’s sucking action on the breast sends a message to the brain. The message stimulates the hypothalamus gland, which in turn stimulates the pituitary gland. Hormones are then released that act on special cells in the breast to produce the milk and send it toward the nipple where it is available for the baby.

Lipase – An enzyme that breaks down fat in breastmilk. In rare instances, some women may have it in higher quantities in their breastmilk, and it can cause breastmilk to develop a bad smell or taste when frozen.

Milk ducts – ducts in the breast that carry milk from the alveoli to the nipple.

Mastitis – generally occurring in breastfeeding women, mastitis causes the breasts to feel hard, sore or uncomfortable. Mastitis is caused when bacteria enters the breast through a break or crack in the nipple’s skin (such as those caused by chapped nipples) or by a plugged milk duct

Oxytocin– the love hormone, in both mom and baby which helps with bonding, stress relief and makes you relax.

Plugged (milk) duct – often caused by mastitis, plugged ducts occur when small milk ducts in the breast become blocked.

Positioning – The way a baby is held or situated when breastfeeding. There are different breastfeeding positions, and you may have to experiment to determine which one is most effective and comfortable for you and your baby.

Prolactin – A hormone produced by the pituitary gland that is responsible for milk production within the alveoli in the breast. During pregnancy, prolactin makes the breasts grow, and after giving birth, it stimulates the milk production. Prolactin is made in response to nipple stimulation when the baby suckles at the breast. Low prolactin levels can affect the mother’s milk supply.

Progesterone- A hormone produced by the placenta in large amounts during pregnancy that stimulates breast development and inhibits production of large volumes of milk.

Pumping – The method of extracting breastmilk with the help of a pump. There are both manual and electrical breast pumps. Pumping enables mothers to provide breastmilk for a caregiver to give to the baby while mom is away (for example, working).Pumping is also often used to stimulate production in a mother who has a low milk supply, to induce lactation or relieve engorgement.

Rooting Reflex-The rooting reflex occurs when touching your breast to the center of the baby’s lips or stroking his cheek causing the baby to open it’s mouth and turn it’s head to one side looking for the breast.

Suck, suckle– The baby’s milking action at the breast; in traditional usage, a baby at the breast “sucked” while a mother “suckled.”

Thrush – a common yeast infection of the mouth and throat caused by the fungus Candida albicans, marked by white patches in the mouth. Thrush can also occur in the gastrointestinal tract and can cause certain types of diaper rash in infants.