My Birth Control Journey/Paraguard {Product review}

**I am definitely not a medical professional. This article is based on my personal experience. As always, please talk to your doctor before making any medical decisions for yourself**

“The best way to reduce the risk of unintended pregnancy among women who are sexually active is to use effective birth control correctly and consistently……..”

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BK#1 was conceived with combined oral contraceptive. That “typical failure rate of 9%”, yeah that is me. I took my pill daily, and had alarm set on my phone so even if I was busy, I couldn’t forget. She is a blessing, we adore her, and in no way is she an “oops”, “accident” or many other things I have heard. The pill simply didn’t work for me.

After she was born I went on a progestin only pill (because I was nursing BK#1) AND we used condoms!

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8 months later I found out I was pregnant with BK#2!! >>> Insert chaos here<<<<

Okay CDC I got you…I am the 9% and apparently in the 18% also?!?!

Our babies are our WORLD and we wouldn’t have it any other way!! Birth control, in general, just infuriates me and scares me. Why spend all this money, if planning your life for your children doesn’t work! God obviously wanted these babies, and they better become lawyers or the president or something.

For those who have a very hard time TTC, or can’t I am truly sorry. This post is not to make you feel bad, but to make woman aware of the stats, and the reality of birth control failure.

After BK#2 was born we made the decision that I would get an IUD. We were not ready to get anything permanent, and make the decision to be done having babies, but SOMETHING had to be done! My body is still recovering 6 months later. A pregnancy a year is not easy on the body, at all. Doctors say it takes a woman’s body 18 months to completely heal…..well BK#1 and BK#2 are only 17 months apart. So, even though I was scared of getting an IUD because of the risk factors, I chose to get one for my health, and sanity!

After months of talking with my  DH, doctor,  and midwife, we decided that I would get a Paragard.BurritoBuzz Paragard2

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Pros: Its more than 99% effective! I like those odds a little better. The string is a cotton string unlike most IUD’s. It is still stiff at first, but it does soften up after a few weeks. Even though it caused a little discomfort at first with my husband, after a week or so it was fine! It lasts for 10 years.  No more alarms going off to take my pill, no more counting days and checking the calendar to see if I missed a day, or if the pack is right, and no more taking pills!!!! YES PLEASE.

There are no hormones, because it is a copper device. >>> No weight gain, mood swings, etc. that come along with a hormone based birth control.

I have had no spotting, or periods since the initial spotting after insertion. I don’t know if that is due to still breastfeeding, or the IUD.

I had no “adjustment time”. No cramping or pain later. BUrritoBuzz Paragard.png

6 months after being pregnant, and I’m not pregnant!!!!!!

My insurance paid for it in FULL! We don’t have that great of insurance either, so be sure to contact them first!

Cons: It hurt like you wouldn’t believe getting it put in! I had two natural births , and I was crying while it was getting put in, I almost passed out, I puked after she was done, and I sat in the office for 30 minutes after it was done to calm down so I could leave.

There are a lot of horror stories about IUD implanting in the uterus etc., but never did I read anything about how I felt that day.

When you get it put in after birth you have to wait a month or so. I scheduled my insertion promptly after delivery, and my midwife and OBGYN insured me that it would be super easy to insert, because of just delivering a huge baby.

IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN EASY FOR THEM!

Honestly, I felt bad for my doctor. I was a mess, but I couldn’t help it! When they dilated my cervix and inserted it I could have swore she was trying to rip out my uterus.

I suggest asking to be numbed, and some valium if you are getting it!

There are the horror stories of IUDs, but that comes with anything. There are even  horror stories for the pill. Its really how you take care of yourself, and making sure you go for your regular checks, and are checking yourself!

The pain of insertion is the only bad thing I have to say about Paragard!

Would I do it again?  Maybe? If they could drug me up, or knock me out! I think its worth it for 10 years.

Be sure to talk about all of your options with your doctor, and educate yourself before putting anything into your body! I hope my experiences can help you!!

~Amanda~

 

 

 

 

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Back to the Grind

pale_yellow_and_white_interlocking_concentric_circlesBack to the Grind

The time has come. You’ve just spent 12 long, often sleepless, but wonderful weeks at home with your new little bundle of joy. You never thought this day would come. There were days when you almost wanted to go back, days you cried because you were just too tired to function and wanted to get away. But deep down, you really would not want to be anywhere else than at home snuggling your babe. Unfortunately, it’s time to go back to the daily grind and return to work. You’re feeling anxious, sad, scared and just plain dread having to leave your little one.

Does this sound familiar?

As a Mommy of two little ones, I’ve felt these emotions and “been there” twice now. For me, going back to my nursing job at an area hospital was inevitable. I knew I would work as far through my pregnancy as I could handle, have my sweet little baby, and then head back to work 12 weeks later. All occupations and individuals are different, but no matter what, returning to work is an adjustment. The fear and stress you may be feeling in the days and weeks leading up to the day could be lessened with some thought and planning.

My hope is that these top 5 tips I have will not only decrease the amount of anxiety you have leading up to the day you’re back on the job, but will also make being at work a little easier.

  1. Make a plan. In the days and weeks leading up to the first day back, start to plan. This can include everything from your childcare provider to the meals on the table. I think planning ahead and being prepared not only makes things easier once the day arrives but it reduces stress all around. We would not have a home cooked meal on the table every night if it wasn’t for the CrockPot. There are so many recipes out there for anything and everything. Most of the time, you can just dump in all of your ingredients before work, turn it on low, and by the time you get home, dinner is served! Best invention ever. Another perk is that there are often leftovers for dinners later in the week and lunches. In our house, we also utilize a calendar that’s right on the refrigerator. This way my husband always knows what shift I’m working and who is watching our kids. We also keep track of when we drop off and pick up our kids here so we know what to pay our sitter. Other appointments and social events are here too that way we can all stay on the same page.
  1. Delegate. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. We all have different people around us supporting us, so use it! Try not to hesitate when it comes to delegating tasks to your spouse or older kids. Don’t be embarrassed to accept help either, especially if someone offers it. My husband and I always refer to ourselves as a Team. We stick together when it comes to decisions and discipline, and we work together when it comes to household chores – we need each other. Our household would not be as “happy” as it is the majority of the time if my husband and I didn’t work together. I know I can always ask him to do something and he will do it. We’re in this together. It’s our family. I cannot wait until our oldest can be more included in this too (she’s 2.5)!
  1. Love your caregiver(s). I know it is not always easy to find good childcare. I cannot begin to express how grateful I am for the childcare that we have and my hope is that you all can find someone equally as wonderful. The most important thing is how you’re going to feel while your child is in the hands of these individuals. If you’re not comfortable and at ease when they are there, you will never feel good leaving them. You can’t put a price on that. Don’t be afraid to ask them anything and everything before you make your decision to go with them. Try to have them watch your little one for a short time prior to you going back so you can all feel better with the transition. When I went back to work after my second child, I had my sitter watch both of my kids individually for a few times and then together too. She was used to watching my oldest daughter, but I wanted to make sure she was completely comfortable with them both before a full 9 hour day. Also, see if your care provider is willing to call or text you updates throughout the work day. I know I look forward to photos of my little ones when I’m on a break at work.

 

  1. Commit to breastfeeding. If this is the route you are going, commit now and don’t look back. Chances are it’s been going relatively well for you up until this point and it still can! Talk to your employer prior to returning so they are aware that you plan to breastfeed and can be accommodating. You guys can discuss where you would pump and how often. Remember to begin using your electric breastpump more and begin building a milk supply as it gets closer to when you will be going back. I found that I was able to freeze about a bottle or two a day by pumping after my little guy’s first two feedings of the day. I also eat oatmeal and drink lots of water. I try to take advantage of the times when I am home and make sure I nurse then. Nothing helps your supply more than that mommy/baby bonding.

There are a few products that have made breastfeeding a success the first time around that I continue to use now with my second child. My Medela double electric breast pump is one of those items. It is still going strong with baby #2 and I was super pumped to learn that my insurance covered a second double electric pump with my second pregnancy. Now I have a pump I can keep at work and one at home. Call your insurance company if you are unsure about your coverage. All insurances should cover at least one pump. It’s going to sound silly, but I also love my Medela hand breastpump. It’s super nice to use if you just need to pump one side and doesn’t take as long to set up/clean up. It’s manual so you also don’t have to worry about plugging it in for power. Finally, I could not live without my breastpump bustier by Medela. It allows you hook up your double electric pump and be hands free. This gives me the freedom to chart, eat lunch, or talk to my family while I’m getting in my work day. At home it comes in handy if I’m brushing my teeth, doing dishes, or making a pot of coffee. My hands are free. It is a lifesaver.

 

  1. Stay positive. There are going to be moments when you feel guilty. That is normal. It kills us inside when we have to be away from our little ones all day and then when we are home we are just preparing for the next work day. You are not alone. Going back to work is what is best for you and your family. Your little one doesn’t even realize you are gone, and he or she is in good hands. Take advantage of the moments when you and your family are all together. Even though your baby may not understand, he or she will sense any stress or tension you might be having, so do your best to leave that at work.

We can do this!! There are working moms everywhere. The day always arrives where our maternity leave comes to an end and we make the leap back into the workforce. Be patient during the transition back. It’s okay to feel emotional and guilty. There may even be a part of you a little excited to go back, getting back into your old routine, and having adult interaction. That’s okay too! I hope these tips can ease your mind. They have helped me tremendously, especially the second time around.

Is there anything that made going back to work easier for you?

-Megan

Product Review: Mirena

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**I am most definitely not a medical professional. This article is based on my personal experiences. As always, please talk to your doctor before making any medical decisions for yourself**

I have had a lot, a LOT of issues with BC. I have tried several different brands and forms with mostly negative results. Before I was married and interested in having children, I wanted a BC that treated strong cramps and heavy, long-lasting cycles. The types of BC I tried before TTC include:

  • Yaz– This daily pill made me feel like my heart was racing and have spells of lightheadedness at random times (the pill was later found to cause severe blood clots and actually does not treat any symptoms of PMS like it claimed).
  • Lo Loestrine Fe– Also a daily pill. This did not treat my heavy, long-lasting cycle and painful cramps.

At this point, my gyno decided I need a constant stream of hormones with no placebo time (like many pills have) So then I tried..

  • Ortho Evra– This is a patch that you place on your waistline, back or rear. It was disgusting. It was like a band aid you wore for one week and then replaced. It left a nasty ring of stickiness (like a band aid) and skin irritation wherever I placed it. It also would come off occasionally in the shower, which left me in constant fear that I was not being protected. I
  • NuvaRing– This is a vaginal ring you replace yourself after 3 weeks in and one week off. This was by far, the worst of all BC I tried. It slipped out constantly and was very gross to put back in myself. But worst of all, it gave me a SEVERE vaginal infection that took two drs (one of which was a urogynocologist) to diagnose and treat. Horrible. Just horrible.

After that horrendous experience, I just dealt with my discomfort and we used the trusty ol’ condom until we were TTC. So after the birth of my LO, I was extremely hesitant to go back on BC but knew it was necessary because I conceived very, very easily and we were certainly not ready for another LO. My gyno suggested Mirena.

Mirena is an intra-uterine device that can stay in for up to 5 years. It slowly releases low levels of progestin into the uterus. The device is inserted by your gyno and small strings are left hanging that are supposed to allow you to check and make sure it is still correctly in place. This BC is recommended for women that have had a child.

imagePROS: When I had mine inserted, my gyno said to me, “pick a four letter word to say now because you’re going to need it when I put it in.” I honestly had to ask her if she was done because I felt nothing other than the usual discomfort of her messing around in that area. It didn’t hurt me in the slightest. I love not having to worry about taking a pill everyday. I have heard some people say that they can feel the strings that are left hanging. I have never had any discomfort. I’ve had the device in for over a year now and (now) I can say that my cycles are short and very light. I still have some cramping, but nothing like I’ve experienced in the past.

CONS: I bled. I bled every single day for almost 5 months. I’m talking several heavy flow pads per day. Mind you, I had a C-section. So this was strictly related to the BC, not from giving birth (I had no bleeding in the 6 weeks after giving birth and before getting Mirena). It was horrible. My poor DH. Not only was my last trimester a painful nightmare, I finally have the baby and we still can’t be intimate because I’m disgusting. Sexy.

It finally got so bad that I was concerned it was not inserted correctly, so I went back to my gyno. She did a full exam and said it was inserted correctly and to just hang in there. My symptoms were not uncommon and if I held out for one more month, it could go away. And she was right. A few weeks after that, my bleeding subsided and I finally began to have a recognizable cycle again. Still, it was quite the ordeal.

In the relatively near future, my DH and I will be TTC again. I am planning an extensive article series on TTC and (God willing) my subsequent pregnancy. I do have a fear of having difficulty conceiving after removing my Mirena. DrugWatch.com states that 80% of women can successfully conceive within one year of removal. Fingers crossed.

I hope my experiences can help you make a better choice on what is right for your body. I can’t say I am a strong proponent of BC after my dreadful experiences, however, it’s a necessary evil in my personal opinion. I’m constantly doing research on what is safest and best for my body. I strongly encourage every woman do the same. Meanwhile, I’ll be continuing my earnest prayers for the development of the male BC pill… *please Jesus, please*

-Chelsea

Infertility Sucks

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It does. It really and truly does, and it is so much more common than you would ever imagine. About 1 in every 6 couples will struggle with infertility. On this page, at the time of me writing this, there are about 170 followers on the Burrito Buzz Facebook page, so statistically about 26 of the followers will struggle (my husband and I follow the page, so that leaves 24, which is crazy!). Infertility is generally defined as a couple trying to conceive for 1 year without medical help and not becoming pregnant. Infertility can also refer to women who struggle to carry babies to term, or who suffer from repeat miscarriages. It sucks.

I will tell you our story so far, and I will also try and keep this brief! I could write/talk for hours on this subject. I’m Chelsea! (Not the Chelsea that is a regular blogger here). I am a good friend of Katie, and she has been a HUGE support system for me! So when she mentioned me doing a guest blog, I was thrilled!  If there is one positive to this whole infertility bull crap, it is that I have the opportunity to spread the word on this taboo (and not covered on most insurances, although it TOTALLY SHOULD BE, I DIDN’T CHOOSE THIS) subject!

My husband and I have been married for a little under 2 years. I’ve been off birth control since January 2014, and we’ve been actively trying to conceive (ttc) since April 2014. Right around the time we started actively trying, I noticed that I wasn’t getting my period (or a positive pregnancy test). Sounds like a dream, right? Except to get pregnant, you need to ovulate, and if you ovulate you will have a period (unless you get pregnant). I spent months tracking my basal body temperature; which involves needing to have at least 4 consecutive hours of sleep, and taking your temperature first thing in the morning, and tracking it on a graph to try and pinpoint when ovulation occurs, I kept a legal pad full of peed on cheapo ovulation strips from Amazon; to try and track when they would get darker, meaning I was close to ovulation, and tracking my cervical mucus (not going into details on this one… lol). We never had luck, and I was driving myself crazy. I vividly remember crying on my bed like a crazy person about my luteal phase not being long enough, and so on and so forth. It was normal for me to go 60+ days with no period, and it was torture… constantly taking tests… constantly getting negatives. I was in denial that I needed medical help, because this is what my body is made for! My husband finally convinced me that I should go see an OB/GYN, so I made an appt. It was more of a “family planning” “pre-pregnancy” type appointment. I can’t remember all the specifics and on what timeline (I’m really good at repressing things!) But the term PCOS was thrown around, we decided to get hubby’s sperm analyzed (which costs $150… crazy…) and we decided we wanted to try a fertility drug called Clomid, to see if it would help me ovulate on my own. I was never actually diagnosed with PCOS at this clinic. And they also told us that the sperm analysis wasn’t that bad… there were a few things a little low, but the count was fine, and even a small percent of millions and millions of sperm, is ok. Cool. We believed them and felt good. This Clomid should work fine for us! Each month you’re on these drugs involved multiple doctors’ visits… blood work, internal ultrasounds, fun! First month I was on a 50mg dosage. I went in for my first follicle study, to see if I had any eggs that might ovulate. NOTHING! I was told it wasn’t even worth our time to “try” that month, and I was given a prescription for a drug called Provera to make me start my period so we could up my dosage of Clomid and try again next month, and add in a ‘trigger’ shot to force me to ovulate ($120 a pop for a shot). Clomid is terrible and makes you a crazy person, btw. The hot flashes are seriously the worst, and if going through infertility won’t make you super emotional, Clomid will. We did three more rounds, 1- 100mg and 2- 150mg… each month sounded hopeful. I was responding to the drugs fine, and producing multiple nice sized follicles, but still no BFP (big fat positive).  Somewhere in there I also had a tube test done to see if my tubes are open and clear ($900). From reading online about the tube test procedure, it seemed pretty easy. Similar to a pap, but they insert a tiny balloon and inflate it to open your cervix, then push dye through a catheter to flow into your tubes while your lay under an x-ray machine. I’d been though a lot already, so this seemed easy! WRONG! The typical test takes less than 5 min. This dude was all up in my business for AT LEAST 10, with a long probe, moving my insides around to try and get this balloon to my cervix… it was awful. Apparently I have a tipped uterus. He finally said that he couldn’t get the balloon where it needed to be, so he was going to do the best he could. Right tube looks great, left he couldn’t get the dye to flow correctly, SO WHO REALLY KNOWS. I cried… on the table, in front of this stranger who was just rooting around in my vagina for the last 10 min. I cried the whole way home. It didn’t seem fair to go through all of that and not have any real answers on one whole side of my tubes!  It was at this point our doctor suggested us taking the next step and seeing a specialist, a Reproductive Endocrinologist.  Taking Clomid for long periods of time can be very harmful to your body and start preventing pregnancy, and increasing your risk for different cancers, plus, we weren’t getting anywhere, so we decided to make an appointment.

I have a friend who went this same fertility clinic, Reproductive Gynecology, and she loved the doctors and ended up pregnant! So I was actually pretty excited. I had been doing plenty of research, and we both knew what we wanted our next step to be, and IUI (artificial insemination). We went to our first appointment and we were immediately crushed. It took everything in me to not break down in front of our doctor when she told us that the sperm analysis was actually pretty bad, and with my possible blocked tube, and possible PCOS, IVF was really our only option. We. Were. Crushed. This is not what we had planned, nor do we have that kind of money. IVF is crazy expensive. We aren’t that infertile. Life isn’t fair. I expressed to her that we really wanted to try an IUI first. They still cost $1000, but compared to the $15,000+ that IVF costs, we thought it was worth a try. 7 vials of blood, 5 days of a different fertility drug, another ‘trigger’ shot, and $1000 later, we were doing our first IUI! We felt so hopeful! It was exactly 1 year to the date that we started trying, and that had to be a sign! We got to the hospital SUPER early so hubs could do his thing with the cup in the room with the porn, and they could “wash” his sperm to remove any impurities/any of the bad disfigured sperm. We roamed the hospital and got some coffee. I had read that IUIs take better when you have a super full bladder! 2 hours later, I was inseminated and we were on our merry way. 2 weeks later, BFN (big fat negative) UGH! This same doctor then tells me she would like us to do 2 more IUIs before moving on to IVF, and we decided to get another opinion. This is the same doctor that told us an IUI wouldn’t likely work for us… now you want us to spend another $2k doing them when we could put that money towards IVF??

I LOVE OUR NEW DOCTOR. He is great and I love him. I hope he can get me pregnant! He informed me that I do indeed have PCOS. FINALLY someone actually bothers to actually diagnose me! He also gave us our odds, which no one else had bothered to do! They are in no means good odds, but it’s nice to hear! Only a 1-2% chance that we will ever conceive naturally, 5% with an IUI (ummm what? And this b*tch wanted us to do that 3 times?!?) and a 50-60% with IVF! We NEVER thought we would end up here, and we also NEVER thought we would be able to afford IVF. Before I have people commenting about adoption.. we know! I’ve actually already gotten info and been in contact with an agency. Our plan is to do 1 round of IVF (plus any FETs if we are blessed enough to have multiple embryos to freeze). Unfortunately adoption is also crazy expensive…and some days I still wonder if we should just skip the IVF and move on to adoption. But I really want to be able to experience pregnancy. And right now I am young and healthy. Adoption will always be an option for us, but IVF won’t be. So since about May of this year, we’ve just been taking it easy, and it is GREAT! Infertility sucks. It is hard on your body, your relationship, your social life, your wallet, your sex life. IT SUCKS! It’s nice to take some time off and be normal. Currently we are just working REALLY hard to raise money for our IVF (which is hopefully going to happen late spring of 2016!!) and doing our best to eat REALLY well, and take lots of vitamins that are suppose to help. We’re talking all organic, grass-fed, cage-free, (gluten and dairy free for me… YUCK), cutting back on caffeine and alcohol (until we completely cut out both at 3 months out) and about 8 vitamins a day. We want to be as physically/emotionally ready for IVF as we possibly can be to give it our best shot!

I’ve found an AWESOME (and I truly mean so awesome I could cry) support system in the form of an online Instagram community of other girls TTC all over the world. They are all so awesome and so dear to my heart. I am actually meeting some of them from Ohio this coming weekend! It’s so inspiring to see girls go through this and get to the other side! We have been SO BLESSED! I cannot even describe. We are passed the ‘poor us’ stage, and are making the best of the situation we are in! I love being able to be a spokesperson for this, and the love and support and connections we’ve made make us believe this is all happening for a reason. This is how it is suppose to go for us. I can only pray that IVF works for us and that it brings us our family that we are SO anxious to have! Katie started a GoFundMe for us (which is SO AWESOME and I’ll never be able to express to her and her husband how much it means to us), and my workplace (I’m a pastry chef) is doing a cookie fundraiser where all the proceeds will go directly to our clinic in our name to help pay our IVF bills. ❤ If you managed to read all this and are struggling with something similar, PLEASE feel free to contact me! I know how lonely it is. I know how every pregnancy announcement brings you to tears. I know that it isn’t fair. But you aren’t alone ❤ ❤ And if anyone wants more information on our GoFundMe, or “Baking for Baby Phares” fundraiser, let me or Katie know! Also, feel free to follow my journey on Instagram  @making_baby_phares

-Chelsea Phares, Guest Blogger

What not to say to a pregnant women!

I know people mean well, but after two pregnancies in two years I can definitely say that there are some things I wish people would never say to pregnant women. Here is a list just to clear up some things you should never say to a pregnant women:

1.“Are you sure it’s not twins?”

2.“Are you sure they have your due date right?”

3.“You’re going to have your hands full!” (As they look at my 1 year old.)

4.“Was it planned?”

5.“You had a natural birth last time? Was that planned? And you seriously want to do it again? Come on–just ask for the epidural! What are you trying to prove?”…..seriously? You want me to answer you?

6.“You look like you are due any day now! Do you really have three more months?!”

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7.“I was all belly when I was pregnant. I only gained 15 pounds.” (I definitely gained more than that!)

8.“Wow, you look like you’re going to pop!”

9.“Wow you’re so huge”

10.“Wow you’re so small”

11.“Are you gaining enough weight?” Any other time in a women’s life you NEVER talk about her weight, why is it all of a sudden okay to talk about our size when we are pregnant? Sure “You’re all belly” and “That bump is adorable” makes us feel good. But do NOT make general statements, because Lord knows we are painfully aware!

12.“You don’t look pregnant. Are you sure you are?” (This can be a compliment to a women of multiple children who has gained a lot of weight, but it can be disappointing to the first-time mom who is already nervous and desperately wants to look pregnant!)

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13.“I think you’re having a …..”

14.“Can I touch your belly?”

15.“You’re breastfeeding right?”

16.“Will you work after the baby comes?”

17.“It’s about time!”

18.“Are you craving pickles?” (No, but now that you mentioned food, I’m really hungry. Thanks for that now go get me some ice cream!)

19.“You can’t eat/drink that” My personal favorite. I will eat and drink WHATEVER I want, because I am pretty sure that it is MY body and you are NOT my OB!

20.“Will you have more kids?”

21.“I feel pregnant too” …..oh? ummm ….

22.“Enjoy your last few months of freedom.” Why do you assume that I will not have a life or freedom after I have a child? Is your life that boring? Just saying.

23.“Your baby is going to be huge/tiny” Again, are you a doctor?

24.“You look tired”

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25.“Anything yet?”

26.“You’re still pregnant”

27.“You know it’s really 10 months.” Gracies. No, seriously. Thanks for that. Because I’m not already praying I can hold my baby any day now, but you have to remind me how long I have to wait.

28.“Well elephants are pregnant for 22 months so you don’t have it that bad” Yeah, thanks for pointing that out.

29.“Good luck my labor was terrible.”

30.“Aren’t you a little young/old to be having a baby?”

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31.“Shouldn’t you be resting?”

32.“You’re quite hormonal.” You haven’t seen anything yet…..

33.“I thought your boobs would be bigger”

34.“How are you going to handle two?”

35.“I never had morning sickness”

36.“I was ripped open from end to end.”

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37.“Can you even see your feet anymore?”

38.“So, how do you get your shoes on?”…..Good question…..

Pregnancy is a beautiful and also disgusting thing! Please do not make the gorgeous women who are making tiny humans want to rip your tiny peewee little head off by saying any of these statements, or any in their likeness! Haven’t you heard not to mess with a pregnant women? The only acceptable statements are:

“You look FABULOUS!”

“I am so happy for you!”

And, “I can’t wait to meet your beautiful baby!”

Now, where is that ice cream you were supposed to get me?!?!?!?

~Amanda

p.s. We have all been there at least once, and we wanted to show you that we really do feel for you preggie mommas!